Quadrant

A quadrant (quad) among other definitions, is “the area included between such an arc and two radii drawn one to each extremity.”

What quadrant do you belong to? Which quadrant are you presently operating in? And which should you truly be in?

Other terms have been used. Terms such as buckets, sections, structure, quarter, etc. But I like the term quadrants. It is the term used by Robert Kiyosaki, the Rich Dad, Poor Dad best-selling author, in his Cashflow Quadrant book. It is a good personal finance read if you choose to read it. I first read the book over a decade ago and it’s being more meaningful now than ever before.

Not everyone is cut out to belong in the same quadrant. The quadrants that I’m talking about are E (Employee), S (Self-Employed), B (Business), and I (Investor).

Over the weekend, I pondered on these quadrants. Most of us will start out as an Employee and progress through the “ranks” before finally settling in one. It is possible to operate in more than one rank simultaneously. But for maximum impact and benefits, it’s better to focus on one. Did I just say that? Scratch that. All Investors are Business folks and vice versa. Most Employees also operate as Self-Employees (Self-Ees).

The E-Quad

We all know what it means to be an Employee; you’re at the mercy of your employer who has placed a cap over what you can make working for him or her and probably a ceiling on how high you can go. The “official” number of hours you signed up for was eight (8) per day or 40 a week. But the number of hours needed to get the job done or to impress the boss so that s/he can remember you (or your name) for promotion or the five percent (5%) annual salary increase, is 10-12 per day or 50-60 per week. Some “smart” Employees, who are aware (and woke) decide simultaneously to start a “business” with the hope of some day transitioning to it. The problem however is that the constant inflow of bi-weekly checks feel so comfortable and subsequently derails the courage to transition.

The S-Quad

The few who do transition however are happy that they’re putting all those hours into “building” their “business”. The problem though is that they are building a Self-Employment. Happy that they are working for themselves and not another person. Happy that they have their own schedule; can choose to work their own hours, schedule doctors’ and dental appointments around their clock without feeling guilty asking someone for time off. And equally happy that they have no micro-mangers standing behind their desks or staring over their heads. But, is Self-Employment really better?

Self-Employment is still a one-man show (sole-proprietor). Well, before you shout me down – yes, you can employ an admin or receptionist. But you are still the major driver of the ship and without you, there’s no business or sailing. The problem also is that you do not get paid if you’re sick or hospitalized. You don’t get paid if you don’t work. If you have a family emergency or a sick child or spouse, you do not get paid for taking time off your work to care for them. And I hope that you do not leave them uncared for because of your work either.

So, which is better?

Self-Employment is good; better (or not necessarily better) than being an Employee depending on your variables and reasons for starting it in the first place.

The B-Quad

The second-to-the-last quad is Business. Being in Business means creating everything that demonstrates that you are doing business. By this, I mean, a business name, business phone, business bank account (with a business debit or credit card) to avoid co-mingling which gets one in trouble with the IRS, a business website, and a business marketing strategy. Setting the business up is one thing, running the business is another. In business, you have (hire) folks who can do other segments of the business while you focus on your area of expertise. These are your team. The goal is to eventually create a system that can run on its own leaving you time to take a vacation, rest (that will be beneficial to avoid sickness), and probably start another business.

The I-Quad

The last quadrant, an Investor, is one that a majority of people never aspire to. This does not mean that you become a stock trader. There are tons of commodities that one can invest in besides stock. You also don’t have to do the investing yourself. There are a few ways to get involve in investing. You can learn to understand the basics or engage the services of investment bankers or companies. It is in the Investing quadrant that you have your money working for you. You can roll the money made from being an employee, self-employed, and your business into Investing.

Ponderous Note

If everyone becomes a Business person or an Investor, who would be their Employees? This is where one’s purpose comes to play. Know yourself and decide accordingly. One can be an Employee and still be an Investor, though the income-generating capacity might be limited. While Income is limited as an employee, it is infinite in business and investing. You can make income in each quad, but one quad generates more than the other. Sure, other variables might contradict this statement. Please do your due diligence, bear in mind your life purpose, and choose your quad wisely.

There are also tax advantages in the B and I quads that are not available to the E and S. Again, do your research, consult a tax advisor.

This post is not saying that one quad is better than the other. It’s just an overview of all the quads.

Making the Ethical Choice in a Gray World – Dr. Stephen R. Graves

Making the Ethical Choice in a Gray World – Dr. Stephen R. Graves
— Read on stephenrgraves.com/articles/read/making-the-ethical-choice-in-a-gray-world-2/

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More on Morals/Ethics. I posted yesterday on Morals Morality and stated that the words are interchangeably used with Ethics.

Sharing Stephen Graves’ article on Making the Ethical Choice in a Gray World.

I hope it blesses you.

Financial Monday: Teenage Millionaires

Do you remember what you did at ages 4, 8, or 9? Most of us probably don’t.

The above featured teenagers started their businesses at those ages. They have now made some impressive business and financial strides that most adults have never made, nor would ever make in their lifetime. I still haven’t made my $1 million dollar, still working towards it!

These teenagers have made millions for themselves, retired or employed their parents, and are using business lingos that most adults have never heard of.

They were not born with silver spoons nor had parents who handed them the businesses. Each teenager made it by sheer curiosity, hard work, and determination.

I would guess that about 50% of most kids their ages put up lemonade or cookie stands outside their homes during summer. I remember being compelled to stop to buy a $1-cup (and a bag of cookies) most times just to encourage those kids. But one took it a notch higher.

Another traded stocks, while one started with “hustling” trading t-shirts. All three are now famous entrepreneurs.

There are probably more of them out there. Geniuses or unicorns? You be the judge.

While most kids were being kids, some are stepping out and being exceptional and even surpassing the adults.

Here’s to their much more success 🪘

What are your thoughts?

Apple and Tesla in the News: Stock-Split

Hopefully this news is not too late. For those who are interested, it’s better late than never.

Apple and Tesla in the News

Apple and Tesla split their stocks 4:1 and 5:1 respectively. Apple announced its split last week; while Tesla’s was announced about two weeks prior. Tesla’s split occurred yesterday and Apple‘s happened today. The stock prices before the split were $500 for Apple and a whooping $2,000 for Tesla!

What is a stock split?

“Companies often split shares of their stock to try to make them more affordable to individual investors. Unlike an issuance of new shares, a stock split does not dilute the ownership interests of existing shareholders. When a company declares a stock split, its share price will decrease, but a shareholder’s total market value will remain the same. For example, if you own 100 shares of a company that trades at $100 per share and the company declares a two for one stock split, you will own a total of 200 shares at $50 per share immediately after the split.”

With the stock split, it is a great time to buy these two stocks as, undoubtedly, the stock prices will rise again. In fact, news already have it that they are already on the rise.

Number One Rule

The number one rule for investment/finance is:

  • buy when prices are low
  • sell when prices rise/high.

If interested in buying the Apple and/or Tesla stocks, or any stock, now is a good time. There are lots of financial boutiques that can help. You can also set up accounts, buy and sell yourself without being a trader. The processes have actually been simplified that you can do it all online using one of the investment apps below.

Here are the best investment apps in August:

• Acorns – Best for worry-free savings
• Robinhood – Best for fee-free trading
• Wealthbase – Best for social experience
• Betterment – Best for low cost
• Stockpile – Best for gifting stocks
• Invstr – Best for learning about investing

Here’s to a joyful investing for those who take advantage of the stock split. 😊

The Heart of Innovation: Why Don’t More People Share Their Best Practices with Each Other?

This blog was posted by Mitch Ditkoff, at idealchampions.com, on June 26, 2020.

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Thankfully the WordPress family doesn’t have this problem as we freely share our best practices with one another. But for those still in the workforce, sharing best practices can be a BIG problem as everyone wants to own the “subject-matter expert,” “go-to person” title. Seems like folks think they would lose by sharing. Little do these people realize that “knowledge shared is knowledge squared.” – Carl Sandburg

Why do think people don’t share their knowledge or best practices? Read Ditkoff’s blog, checkout his website, and let’s learn why people hoard them. I hope you enjoy the blog.

“If you are a member of a team, business, school, or volunteer organization, there’s a good chance you want whatever project you are working on to succeed. Yes? Towards that end, you work hard, think hard, generate ideas, go to meetings, fight fires, and (hopefully) learn from your mistakes. If you are like most people, you sometimes get together with your team and talk about ways to increase your odds of success.

Still, there’s a good chance you may be overlooking one of the simplest, most effective ways to make progress — and that is the sharing of best practices.

Best practices“, a much written about topic in the business literature, is really nothing more than a two-word euphemism for “what works” — the efforts you and your colleagues make that are already contributing to your success. The good stuff.
Curiously, however, “best practices” are rarely shared in most organizations and, even when they are, they are not shared effectively. Why? There are ten main reasons.

TEN REASONS WHY BEST PRACTICES ARE NOT SHARED

  1. Command and Control: The leaders of most enterprises, even if they won’t admit it, aren’t really committed to people sharing their ideas with each other. It sounds strange, but it’s true. Why does this phenomenon exist? Because ideas, freely shared, often end up “rocking the boat.” Old ways of doing things get challenged. The status quo gets confronted. New possibilities need to be considered, evaluated, and funded. Or not funded. More emails abound. More opinions. More disagreements. More meetings. Cranky-inducing stuff.
  2. No Clear, Compelling Vision of Success: If people, working on same project, aren’t on the same page about WHY they are working together and WHY they get out of bed in the morning, it is unlikely that they will be motivated enough to go beyond the “same old, same old” syndrome. Without a clear, compelling vision to motivate them beyond the call of duty, many people end up just going through the motions. Rote takes precedence. Old habits rule. Mediocrity prevails.
  3. No Sense of Interdependence: People will not take the time to share their insights, ideas, and best practices with each other if there is no recognition of the need to collaborate. If teamwork is not a clearly articulated (and reinforced) organizational value, there will be very little chance that the people doing the work are going to make the effort to connect with each other.
  4. Lack of Trust and Appreciation: People may recognize the need to collaborate with each other, but they may not like or trust each other. It takes effort to reach out to other people — especially people who are different than you. Sometimes, it’s a risk, especially for introverts. Plus, if people are working in remote locations, in different time zones, the degree of difficulty increases. Without trust and a genuine appreciation for the perspective of others, best practices will rarely, if ever, be shared.
  5. No Clarity About What a Best Practice Is: If you ask me to bring a tuna fish sandwich to a meeting, I can do that. But if you ask me to bring a “best practice”, who knows what you’ll get. If you want best practices to be shared in your organization, be very clear about what you are asking people to communicate.
  6. No Intention. No Agreement. No Buy-In: It’s fine to generically request people to share their best practices, but unless your request is understood, honored, and owned. it’s just fairy dust. People are busy. People are maxed. You asking them to do one more thing will likely be met with head nods at best. So, if you want to make this best practice sharing thing real, you will need to make the effort to build a case for it and give people a chance to commit to it from an authentic place.
  7. Fear of Judgment: Some people have a truckload of best practices to share, but they are sometimes concerned that other people may not think their best practices are so hot. Or, if they’ve done something they think is truly innovative, they may be concerned that others will judge them for not asking permission or going one bridge too far. The result? They clam up and keep things to themselves.
  8. The Perception of Lack of Time: Face it. We live in an ADD world. Even the fact that you have read this far is astounding. If a person thinks they have no time, there is very little chance they are going to say YES to a “best practice sharing process” that will take some time — even if the process, itself, will yield ideas that will save them time and radically increase their odds of success.
  9. Lame Listening: The sharing of best practices requires two things: someone to speak and someone to listen. Most of us, of course, would rather speak than listen. If you and your team are committed to sharing what you are learning with each other, make sure that listening — real listening — is baked into the process.
  10. No Platform: Sharing best practices with other people requires some kind of communication method or platform. If your team does not have a reliable way to share what they are learning, it’s doubtful they will. What platform might work best for your team? Group skype calls? One-on-one phone calls? Monthly meetings? Email? A Facebook Group? An end-of-the-year conference? A blog?

What other obstacles would you add to the above list? But more importantly, what can YOU do in the next seven days to jump start the process of the team you work most closely with sharing their best practices with each other?”