Cooking with Unmis: Fried Yellow Plantains

The Yellow Plantain, from the family of bananas, can be fried or boiled. Some like the plantain really ripe and soft; others like it just right and fresh. Some also like it fried till it’s deep brown in color, while others prefer that it maintains its yellow color.

Fried Yellow Plantain can be eaten alone or paired with rice or beans. “It is made in different ways: salted or unsalted, cut into “ears”, “fingers”, can be diced, or fried whole.”

Like to know more, click here.

How do you like your Beans? 😍

The above pictures show cooked Beans in its whole form, cooked with corn, mashed, ground and steamed, and ground and fried.

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Beans come in a variety of types. It has been stated that, globally, there are 40,000 types of beans. The most common ones in the U.S. include:

  • Red (Kidney) beans
  • Black-eyed beans
  • Black beans
  • Orange beans
  • Pinto beans
  • Lentils.

Black-eyed peas was used to cook the above. Orange beans can also be used.

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Beans is a staple in some countries around the world. It is rich in nutrients such as protein, iron, folic acid, thiamin, and calcium. It is also highly recommended as dietary additions for its health benefits in controlling diabetes, heart, cancer, and in weight management.

How do you like your Beans?

Cooking with Unmis: Ewedu (aka Jute Leaves)

Corchorus is the genus for Jute leaves, known as Ewedu by Yorubas (one of the main Nigerian tribes). Corchorus has about 40-100 species “with jute applying to the fiber produced from the plant, and jute mallow leaves for the leaves used as a vegetable.”

Jute leaves is common amongst Asians and Africans. The Philippines call it Saluyot. You can buy them fresh or frozen from local ethnic grocery stores. The fresh leaves need to be removed off the stems and thoroughly rinsed before cooking. The frozen ones are ready to cook.

Cooking Instructions

  1. Rinse the frozen Jute Leaves with cold water
  2. Pour in a blender (use Pulse or Chop options if your blender has it).
  3. Swiftly blend (prolonged blending will smoothen the leaves)
  4. Pour in a small pot (1-1.75 qt)
  5. Add salt
  6. Add a cup of water
  7. Using low heat, cook for about 5 minutes. (medium to high heat will let the Jute Leaves overflow.)
  8. Stir occasionally still to avoid overspilling.

When cooked, it has a texture similar to okra and it’s rich in minerals and nutrients such as beta carotene, iron, vitamin A, C, and E. You can cook it plain or garnish with dried fish or dried crayfish 😊

Though different ethnicities cook it differently, Nigerians eat it best with any of the Nigerian solids such as Eba, Amala, Semolina, or Pounded Yam. A few have been known to eat it with cooked Rice.

Aata Din-din (Fried Sauce)

Credits: UNMIS

As the name implies, this sauce is fried with little or no water added. Any water added is allowed to dry out while cooking to maintain its potency.

Ingredients

  • My Sauce
  • Oil (your choice of palm, olive, vegetable, corn, etc.)
  • Maggi (or any bouillon) cube
  • Tomato Paste
  • Onion
  • Salt

Cooking Instructions

  1. Pour My Sauce into a small pot
  2. Slice (or cube) 1/3 of a small onion
  3. Add a teaspoon of tomato paste
  4. Add salt and/or 1 Maggi (or Knorr) cube to desired taste
  5. Cook over low heat till sauce thickens and there’s no longer any water
  6. Add the a 1/2 – 1 cup of oil
  7. Let simmer for about 3 minutes.

Sauce is ready.

The sauce lasts you for a while because a little of it goes a long way. Use as a dip with bread/rolls, great especially over beans and or fried plantain. Or mix with your desired choice of meat over rice.

Recipe: Egusi Stew

Courtesy of (C) UNMIS

I’ve been cooking people but haven’t posted any recipe lately! Today I’m sharing a few 😍 Enjoy!

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Egusi Stew on Tik Tok!

There has been a rave, on Tik Tok, of folks eating and/or trying Egusi Stew for the first time; thus popularizing the West African/Nigerian, delicacy. These foodies’ actions, videotaping and sharing on the Tik Tok app, are commendable as Egusi Stew has now gained more recognition within the past month than it ever did since its invention! Here are couple of the videos:

🤣🤣🤣 Folks ain’t no need “smacking” the fufu! Chewing or swallowing is also a choice. Some swallow when eating the solids with Okra or the Ogbono that the guy got because it’s slimy, it slides down your throat easily; else, it’s always better to chew.

Is’t a Stew or Soup?

You drink soup in its liquid form, but stew is not drinkable. Stew has to be eaten with a complementary food.

Egusi, is a Stew (I wonder why some still refer to it as a soup) and one of my “specials” to make. I share it with you today.

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Ingredients

  • Ground Egusi (watermelon seeds)
  • My Sauce
  • Your choice of meat, chicken, or seafood (optional)
  • Garnishment; your choice of leaf vegetables such as green or red spinach or bitter leaf (optional)
  • Your choice of oil (recommended are palm, olive, vegetable)
  • Ground crayfish or dried cured fish (optional)
  • Onion
  • Knorr or you Maggi cubes
  • Salt

General information

Egusi stew is nutritious and highly rich in protein and iron.

There are a variety of ways to cook Egusi. It can be cooked minimally or richly with variety of ingredients as you want. It can also be a vegan or vegetarian meal – that’s why most of the ingredients are optional. It can also be cooked in a watery or waterless (or using minimal water) form.

Cooking Instructions

  1. Over medium heat, pour My Sauce into a small-medium saucepan
  2. Add your choice of oil
  3. Slice (or cube) 1/6th of the onion into it
  4. Add a teaspoon of salt and a cube of the Knorr or Maggi (add another cube later if necessary or desired for taste)
  5. Add 1-1 1/2 cups of water
  6. Add the ground egusi (1-1/2 cups)
  7. If using, add the optional items except the leaf vegetable
  8. Prep the leaf vegetable; cut (optional), rinse, place in a bowl, add salt, and hot water. Place aside. [If using the green spinach, leave in the hot water for only couple of minutes. Other greens require much longer time.]
  9. Allow to cook for about 10 minutes.
  10. Reduce heat
  11. Strain the leaf vegetable and add to the pot
  12. Let cook for another minute uncovered (this allows the leaf veggie to retain its green color 😊).
  13. Turn off heat.

Your delicious sumptuous Egusi Stew is now ready. Enjoy it over cooked rice or any of the various African “solids” such as Fufu, Eba, Amala or Lafun (the white variation), Iyan (Pounded Yam), Farina, or Semolina.

Appreciation

I appreciate the resources from Wikipedia. I couldn’t have explained the ingredients any better. Please support the website with a donation or by contributing to their wiki. Thanks.