5 Tests of a Leader – Dr. Stephen R. Graves

5 Tests of a Leader – Dr. Stephen R. Graves
— Read on stephenrgraves.com/articles/read/5-tests-of-a-leader-2/

The Heart

Our hearts are tender and should always be kept pure at all times. If not, things such as greed, lust, bitterness, un-forgiveness, resentment, etc. could clog it up and turn us into a contemptuous cynical being that no-one wants to be around. This list also includes the “unhealthy” independence. I’m beginning to accept that being independent is a trait that demonstrates that one loves to roll (or fly) solo and does not need anyone. It is also a false sense of independence. A blog for another day.

Dr. Graves has something to say not only about the unhealthy independence, but also the storms (or tests) of our hearts.

The tender heart can grow cold and callous if left untended. We need to do a regular healthy check. “Search me oh God and see if there be any iniquity in me” (Psalm 51)

I love to receive Dr. Steve Graves’s articles and read how he “weaves themes of strategy, leadership and faith together.” I’ve shared couple or more of his articles previously. In this article, Dr. Graves asks five questions based on the heart:

  1. Where can you give this week and what can you give away?
  1. Where do you need to flee today?
  1. Who do you need to forgive this week?    
  1. Are you suffering from unhealthy independence?
  1. Where do you need to share credit?

I could do away with the unhealthy independence which, for the longest time, I didn’t see as unhealthy prior to now. You know, you cultivate the attitude of not wanting to bother anyone if that was all you heard as a child. Now I know better and have to be intentional about asking for help.

Your turn. Which of the questions resonate with you. I hope you love the article.

Strong Women of Africa

Strong Women of Africa was first blogged on November 25, 2020 as part of The Strong Women Series. The first of the Series highlighted my favorite Strong Women of The Bible. In honor of International Women’s Day, and celebrating all women globally during the month of March being Women’s Month, I will re-blog the Series throughout the remainder of March. Read along, even if you read the initial post of each section of the Series, as changes may have been made.

Credy: azquotes

We congratulate Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala (NOI), the newly-appointed General of World Trade Organization. Madam NOI was actually included in the initial blog though in an acting capacity.

As you may, or may not, know, Africa is a continent comprising of fifty-five 55) countries spread across its northern, southern, central, eastern, and western regions; each having seven (7), five (5), seven (7), twenty (20), and seventeen (16) countries respectively. Nigeria is the most populous African country with 206 million. For countries that make up each region, please click here.

This information is necessary to help visualize the magnitude of people that we are attempting to highlight. It is impossible to include every strong woman of the continent. As previously stated, in our initial blog of the Series, several strong women are unknown. Most are heads of their households. Those who are married are overworked and inadequately compensated or not compensated at all. Those in the workforce are still grossly underpaid compared to their male counterparts working the same job.

In my research, I found a UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) interactive map of Women in African History. I love the interactives; I hope you do too. Unfortunately, this interactive lists only 32 women; one woman per country highlighted. There were 23 countries that did not have any woman highlighted. Click on the link above for the interactive map and on the picture to view details of the woman.

We know that there are tons of Strong Women of Africa than the referenced interactive showcased. But I would rather not burden you with the encyclopedic information of these Strong Women. As you read, if you know or have heard of any Strong Woman, kindly include her in the comment.

The above highlights Historic Strong Women of Africa. This link, courtesy of Forbes, showcases modern notable Strong Women of Africa. Again, the list might not be exhaustive. Include other known names you’ve either read about, heard, or known in the comments.

Credits: azquotes

African Women, like their global counterparts have defied several odds to attain their current pinnacles. From the first African female Head of State, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf of Liberia (there has since been other African female Heads of States), to Asnath Mahapa, the first African woman to become a pilot in South Africa, to Wangari Maathai, the first African woman to receive the Nobel Peace Prize, to Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, the first African woman to head the World Trade Organization (WTO), African Women continue to graciously stamp their footprints on the sands of time. Yet, there are still more Strong African Women needed to rise up and/or pass the baton on. I salute your courage and thank you for paving the way.

Happy International Women’s Day.

So the former President was acquitted but who was really responsible?

Credits: John Cameron / Unsplash

I’m sure that you’ve heard the news and I’m curious to hear your thoughts on it. I was musing on the news that the 45th President of USA, Mr. Donald Trump, was acquitted from impeachment because of a lack of two-thirds majority required to convict him. Were you happy for him or, like the majority of people, angry with the constitutional process?

The 45th President

There were three quarters regarding the 45th President: one quarter believed that Donald Trump is evil, racist, homophobic, and the (WOATs) worst-of-all-times President; another believed that he was bold, one who could stand up to anyone and one President who was needed for America; yet another quarter were clueless and could care less. Which quarter did you reside in?

We all knew that Donald Trump was impeached twice; once in 2019 while in office for “abuse of power and obstruction of justice”, and recently on January 13, 2021 for insurrection. This was after leaving the office of the President of the USA. This second impeachment was right in the middle of two critical events in the US; that is, exactly a week both before the swearing-in of new President, Joe Biden and after the insurrection. The second impeachment was strategically time-slated and makes Donald Trump the first US President ever to be impeached twice.

Again, like you know, the impeachment proceedings commenced on February 9th and ended with Donald Trump’s acquittal on February 13, 2021.

Did you move quarters after the acquittal or did you love your quarters more? Why?

Personally, I think both impeachments were merely political maneuverings that were unnecessary. I would have been both surprised and disappointed if the outcome of the second impeachment had passed. Why? I’m glad you asked.

  1. I watched both sessions pre-impeachment (to decide if it was constitutional to proceed) and the impeachment hearing itself. Both sides made compelling arguments for and against; some more emotional and convincing than others, that could move the easily-swayed to either side.
  2. It would have contradicted the new President’s call for unity.
  3. It would have lifted the Congress higher and as the optimal seating of the US power rather than the constitutionally-shared power among the Executive, Legislative, and Judicial.

. . .

Undoubtedly , there are consequences when a President is convicted of an impeachment. One of such is that he would have been barred from the GOP from ever running for office again. Another is that he would have been stripped of all benefits and privileges accorded to former Presidents. Read more here.

It is the latter that irks me.

It is a tremendous service of the highest order to be the President of the USA of which there are equally prestigious perks, honors, and most times sleepless nights as well as reliving the saying “uneasy lies the head that wears the crown.” Not all countries can boast of these perks. To have those perks removed as a result of the actions of some folks, in my opinion, would have been extremely unfair.

Now let’s talk about the real people who committed the insurrection.

Who was really responsible for the Insurrection?

One question we were often asked as children was “if someone asked you to put your hands in a blazing fire, would you?” Another was “if someone asked you to jump from the rooftop of a skyscraper, would you?” It didn’t mean that anyone would indeed say such things, but it was a learning statement for kids to think before they commit any act. By the time you’ve heard those statements repeatedly for years, you wise up knowing that if you erred, you cannot be exonerated telling your parents or teachers or any elder that someone made you do it. Smart kids would normally reply that you show them first what you were asking them to do aka learning by example!

My people, let’s not blame Donald Trump. It’s a free country where the Constitution upholds freedom of speech. The President, oh excuse me, the former President was free to open his mouth and freely utter anything he wants. The people we saw on the television, aired globally, were indeed adults and not children. Several could have been parents too. They chose to act without thinking. So I hope that Congress rightly goes after and prosecute the culprits we all saw breaking in, vandalizing government properties, and putting government officials’ lives in jeopardy, including any insiders who connived or collaborated with them.

I didn’t really believe that the former President’s legal team did a great job, but I am glad that Donald Trump was acquitted.

I hope that we all learned some lessons from it all. That we need to:

  1. Think before we vote going forward
  2. Think before we act foolishly based on someone else’s words or actions to us
  3. That Congress would think before wasting government funds conducting a wild goose chase.
  4. That Donald Trump would also now realize that no one is above the law and hopefully, should he choose to run in 2024 , if allowed, will dignifiedly act as a man of honor worthy to represent the USA, including would have learned to be a unifying leader and not a divisive one.

I ask again, were you angry or glad that Donald Trump was acquitted – please no partisan sentiments. Feel free to share your thoughts.

Thanks for reading.

The Heart of Innovation: Why Don’t More People Share Their Best Practices with Each Other?

This blog was posted by Mitch Ditkoff, at idealchampions.com, on June 26, 2020.

. . .

Thankfully the WordPress family doesn’t have this problem as we freely share our best practices with one another. But for those still in the workforce, sharing best practices can be a BIG problem as everyone wants to own the “subject-matter expert,” “go-to person” title. Seems like folks think they would lose by sharing. Little do these people realize that “knowledge shared is knowledge squared.” – Carl Sandburg

Why do think people don’t share their knowledge or best practices? Read Ditkoff’s blog, checkout his website, and let’s learn why people hoard them. I hope you enjoy the blog.

“If you are a member of a team, business, school, or volunteer organization, there’s a good chance you want whatever project you are working on to succeed. Yes? Towards that end, you work hard, think hard, generate ideas, go to meetings, fight fires, and (hopefully) learn from your mistakes. If you are like most people, you sometimes get together with your team and talk about ways to increase your odds of success.

Still, there’s a good chance you may be overlooking one of the simplest, most effective ways to make progress — and that is the sharing of best practices.

Best practices“, a much written about topic in the business literature, is really nothing more than a two-word euphemism for “what works” — the efforts you and your colleagues make that are already contributing to your success. The good stuff.
Curiously, however, “best practices” are rarely shared in most organizations and, even when they are, they are not shared effectively. Why? There are ten main reasons.

TEN REASONS WHY BEST PRACTICES ARE NOT SHARED

  1. Command and Control: The leaders of most enterprises, even if they won’t admit it, aren’t really committed to people sharing their ideas with each other. It sounds strange, but it’s true. Why does this phenomenon exist? Because ideas, freely shared, often end up “rocking the boat.” Old ways of doing things get challenged. The status quo gets confronted. New possibilities need to be considered, evaluated, and funded. Or not funded. More emails abound. More opinions. More disagreements. More meetings. Cranky-inducing stuff.
  2. No Clear, Compelling Vision of Success: If people, working on same project, aren’t on the same page about WHY they are working together and WHY they get out of bed in the morning, it is unlikely that they will be motivated enough to go beyond the “same old, same old” syndrome. Without a clear, compelling vision to motivate them beyond the call of duty, many people end up just going through the motions. Rote takes precedence. Old habits rule. Mediocrity prevails.
  3. No Sense of Interdependence: People will not take the time to share their insights, ideas, and best practices with each other if there is no recognition of the need to collaborate. If teamwork is not a clearly articulated (and reinforced) organizational value, there will be very little chance that the people doing the work are going to make the effort to connect with each other.
  4. Lack of Trust and Appreciation: People may recognize the need to collaborate with each other, but they may not like or trust each other. It takes effort to reach out to other people — especially people who are different than you. Sometimes, it’s a risk, especially for introverts. Plus, if people are working in remote locations, in different time zones, the degree of difficulty increases. Without trust and a genuine appreciation for the perspective of others, best practices will rarely, if ever, be shared.
  5. No Clarity About What a Best Practice Is: If you ask me to bring a tuna fish sandwich to a meeting, I can do that. But if you ask me to bring a “best practice”, who knows what you’ll get. If you want best practices to be shared in your organization, be very clear about what you are asking people to communicate.
  6. No Intention. No Agreement. No Buy-In: It’s fine to generically request people to share their best practices, but unless your request is understood, honored, and owned. it’s just fairy dust. People are busy. People are maxed. You asking them to do one more thing will likely be met with head nods at best. So, if you want to make this best practice sharing thing real, you will need to make the effort to build a case for it and give people a chance to commit to it from an authentic place.
  7. Fear of Judgment: Some people have a truckload of best practices to share, but they are sometimes concerned that other people may not think their best practices are so hot. Or, if they’ve done something they think is truly innovative, they may be concerned that others will judge them for not asking permission or going one bridge too far. The result? They clam up and keep things to themselves.
  8. The Perception of Lack of Time: Face it. We live in an ADD world. Even the fact that you have read this far is astounding. If a person thinks they have no time, there is very little chance they are going to say YES to a “best practice sharing process” that will take some time — even if the process, itself, will yield ideas that will save them time and radically increase their odds of success.
  9. Lame Listening: The sharing of best practices requires two things: someone to speak and someone to listen. Most of us, of course, would rather speak than listen. If you and your team are committed to sharing what you are learning with each other, make sure that listening — real listening — is baked into the process.
  10. No Platform: Sharing best practices with other people requires some kind of communication method or platform. If your team does not have a reliable way to share what they are learning, it’s doubtful they will. What platform might work best for your team? Group skype calls? One-on-one phone calls? Monthly meetings? Email? A Facebook Group? An end-of-the-year conference? A blog?

What other obstacles would you add to the above list? But more importantly, what can YOU do in the next seven days to jump start the process of the team you work most closely with sharing their best practices with each other?”

6 Habits of Highly Focused People

by Nick Wignali

”Focus is a skill you cultivate, not a technique you implement. If you want to improve your ability to focus deeply and do your best work, work to cultivate these habits:

Embrace routines: “The imagination is unleashed by constraints. You break out of the box by stepping into shackles.” – Jonah Lehrer

Procrastinate productively: “The way to get started is to quit talking and begin doing. – Walt Disney

Ruthlessly eliminate distractions: “Edit your life frequently and ruthlessly. It’s your masterpiece after all.” – Nathan W. Morris

Be compassionate with yourself after setbacks: “It’s not that I’m so smart, it’s just that I stay with problems longer.” – Albert Einstein

Take advantage of inspiration but don’t rely on it: “Amateurs sit and wait for inspiration, the rest of us just get up and go to work.” – Stephen King

Make the time to clarify your values: “Far and away the best prize that life offers is the chance to work hard at work worth doing.” – Theodore Roosevelt”

To read the full details of each of the above points, click on this: 6 Habits of Highly Focused

. . .

My Thoughts:

Focus is both a science and an art. The art is your creativity; how you utilize your uniqueness and innate gifts to partner with the science. Find the art that works best for you and embrace it! But whatever you do, remain steadily focused. Distractions will always come, if one allows them or give them a thought, one’s tasks will never be completed.

In the Church, distractions are tagged as a spirit. You simply cast it out by speaking to (better yet, commanding) it “Oh I see you, but you aren’t going to disturb me today or ever. Now, get out and return to where you came from in Jesus’s Name” or “I cast you out in Jesus’s Name.”

Peace people.

110 days from today …

What are you going to do?

Whatever you do, do it totally with your heart knowing that you have read, watched, and studied, all that needs to be digested. That, above all, you have studied “to show thyself approved unto God, a workman that needeth not to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth. But shun profane and vain babblings: for they will increase unto more ungodliness.”
‭‭(2 Timothy‬ ‭2:15-16‬)

Whatever you do 110 days from today, please seriously refrain from groupthink or bandwagon effect of joining the acts or desires of the populace.

Finally, whatever you do, stop, pray, and ponder to ask yourself, will I be able to live with myself after this or will I regret having acted contrary to the truth and my heart.

I say pray because often not all that appears good are of God. I repeat, everything that looks, feel, and or sound good are not of God. Few are obvious to the naked eye, but many are discreet that will fool even the very elect (Matthew 24:24b). Be not one of those who think that God can be mocked for whatsoever we sow, we shall reap (Galatians 6:7-8).

. . .

The frailty of humanity is that we focus on the negatives of the past and of one another and sadly forget the good of both the past and one another. Psychologists confirm that this is how our brains are hardwired and term it negativity bias. Click the links below to read more on the term:

. . .

In 110 days from today, I implore you to focus on merits rather than the negatives and VOTE with your heart for the Truth.

You have ample time to research and digest each candidate and, of course, each proposition.. Start today so that 110 days from today, you will know what to do and will do that which you ought to have done.

. . .

America is presently in a dire state. But there’s hope still for by His mercies, America shall not be consumed because great is His faithfulness! (Lanentations 3:22-24)

Let your voice be heard; exercise your civic right and let your vote count. No excuses. You can Vote by mail. Check out information on how to now and be ready to vote 110 days from today.

Peace!

Leadership Styles: A Curation

Let’s talk about Leadership Styles!

How many leadership styles are you familiar with or have heard of? What style do you favor or lean towards?

Leadership Style

Leadership style is a process that the leader uses or favors and for which s/he is noted for by her or his followers (and staff). Leadership style can vary depending on the situation and/or objectives. Whereas the style can be dynamic, the leader’s trait/characteristics ought to be constant.

The Various Styles

  1. Authentic

“The recent Authentic Leadership approach seems to have evolved in the light of major scams and scandals, a blind race for profits and personal gains and a short term perspective, involving the CEO of top organizations. It focuses on the character of the leader as the driver of positive interrelationships. Authenticity is about “being genuine and not attempting to play a role; not acting in a manipulative way.”

  1. Autocratic or Authoritarian

Autocratic or authoritarian leadership is a leadership style characterized by individual control over all decisions and little input from group members. Autocratic or authoritarian leaders typically make choices based on their ideas and judgments and rarely accept advice (or input) from followers.”

  1. Bureaucratic

“Bureaucratic leadership is one of the leadership styles postulated by Max Weber in 1947. It is a system of management whereby employees are made to follow specific rules and lines of authority created by the superiors. In other words, these set of leaders function based on official regulations fixed by higher authorities within the organization.”

“Under bureaucratic leadership, a leader believes in structured procedures and ensure that his or her employees follow procedures exactly.”

  1. Charismatic

“Charismatic leaders are essentially very skilled communicators – individuals who are verbally eloquent, but also able to communicate to followers on a deep, emotional level. They can articulate a compelling or captivating vision, and to arouse strong emotions in followers.”

  1. Collaborative

“Collaborative leadership is the type of leadership required to get effective and efficient results across internal or external organizational boundaries. A collaborative leader invests time to build relationships, constructively handles conflicts, and share control … collaborative leadership recognizes that power is greatest in a collective team.”

  1. Contrarian (as written by USC on behalf of, and on establishing a scholarship in the author’s (Steven Sample) name)

“A contrarian leader, as defined by Sample, is one who sees situations from his/her unique point of view and who finds genuinely new solutions to the challenges facing his organization …” I read The Contrarian’s Guide to Leadership book and highly recommend it. There’s a lot more to my brief curation. Of course, same applies to the other styles, but since I haven’t read the specific book titles, I cannot attest to nor recommend it 🙂

  1. Democratic

“The word democracy means “rule by the people” and it has its roots in ancient Greece where democracy, as we have come to know it today, started from. The basic idea is that the people hold the power to decide who leads them instead of someone ruling over them, such as in tyranny or oligarchy … The democratic style also referred to as participative leadership, involved the subordinates in the decision-making. The leader and the subordinates shared an equal voice with no hierarchy. Both the leader and the subordinates were equally subject to appraisal, with strong feedback structures in place.”

“Leadership is solving problems.”

Colin Powell
  1. Laissez-faire

Laissez-faire leaders allow subordinates to decide how to complete their tasks and projects, but not to make organization-wide decisions. 

  1. Relational

“Relational Leadership is defined as a relational process of people together attempting to accomplish change or make a difference to benefit the common good. This philosophy would value being ethical and inclusive. It would acknowledge the diverse talents of group members and trust the process to bring good thinking to the socially responsible changes group members agree they want to work toward. Relationships are the key to leadership.”

  1. Servant

“The servant-leader is servant first… It begins with the natural feeling that one wants to serve, to serve first. Servant leadership is a philosophy and set of practices that enrich the lives of individuals, builds better organizations, and ultimately creates a more just and caring world.”

  1. Situational

Situational Leadership® is an adaptive leadership style. This strategy encourages leaders to take stock of their team members, weigh the many variables in their workplace, and choose the leadership style that best fits their goals and circumstances.

Situational Leadership® is not based on a specific skill of the leader; instead, he or she modifies the style of management to suit the requirements of the organization.”

  1. Strategic

This is a style that encompasses all the other styles of leadership. It is visionary in mode, works to effect necessary change(s), apply and utilization of resources in means.

It is a leadership style that cannot be exhausted. There are tons of articles and books on Strategic Leadership. Find one that you like if you’re interested in learning more about this style.

  1. Transactional

“Transactional Leadership is also often known as Managerial Leadership, due to its objective focus on supervision, organization, and group performance … It is based around the simple behavioral tenet of motivators. Its main focus is on specific tasks, using rewards and punishments as incentives and motivation. When employees are successful, they are rewarded; and when they are unsuccessful, they are reprimanded … Transactional leaders view the relationship between employee and leader as an exchange. One offers the other something (e.g. a task) for something in return (e.g. a reward).”

  1. Transformational

It is a style that is utilized by leaders possessing specific traits, who look to work alongside their team members to identify change and develop the next action steps. But most importantly, they transform others – developing and empowering their followers to become leaders in and of themselves. 

Final thoughts

There are various new and emerging leadership styles out there which I will state are mostly a variant of existing ones. While some styles will remain with us forever, some will become unpopular and faze out.

Click here to take a leadership style quiz. For more ways on how to identify and develop your leadership style, I found this Harvard Business Review (HBR) article, by Matt Gavin, very helpful.

Care to share your leadership style(s), please leave a comment below. Thanks for reading.

Your Leader-ship Matters

You are a leader to someone at some place.

An organization and its staff often reflect its leader. That organization could be your home/family, school, religious place, or extra-curricular activity. You will observe that whatever values the one at the helm holds dear to him/her will be the values that trickle down through its leadership, to the staff or team members. In a business setting, the values will ultimately flow from top to the bottom of the organizational echelon until an expert is invited to train or advise the leaders of (an often necessary) change. In essence, there’s a positive correlation between the leader, leadership, and organizational culture. 

To clarify so that we’re all on the same page, the leader of an organization is its CEO or President of that organization. S/he is the one at the helm of the organization. The leadership of the organization, on the other hand, consists of all the leaders; that is, the CEO, COO, CIO, CTO, CAO, etc. We also know them as “Management.”

The leader’s style is his/her Charisma or lack thereof, The way he or she talks and connects emotionally with his/her staff; superiors, peers, and subordinates.

The leadership style is the Culture that is visible in the organization’s mission, goals, and vision. Read what Matt Fagaly has to say on this.

It is always a great feeling to enjoy one’s work/job. Why not? Because one spends a third (or longer) of one’s day at work. 

Also, when one aligns with its organization’s culture or values, one is happier and more productive. The reverse is the case when there’s a misalignment. The sooner one realizes that one is a misfit, the earlier the better for that person to start looking for new office home. Likewise, business owners employing folks who do not align with the leader (or organization’s) values and are only about the salary, will often spell DOOM.

Most of us stay too long on a job and are miserable with the resultant effect on productivity and health/wellness. Sadly, some of us don’t know (nor have learned) how not to carry these negative effects home to our loved ones.

So, knowing what values are important to you should guide you in the company you work for or the people you hire. Don’t let the high salary or charisma entice you and end up being miserable. Yay Yay Yay we live in a world that no longer holds dear (social, moral, ethical) values any longer. But for those of us who still do; I’m not judging anyone (this is a statement and an excuse that is now prevalently being used that indirectly means to “mind one’s own business”), values are important and we should align work and company to them accordingly.

If you’re looking for a job, want to change your current job, or need to hire someone, write down your top three or five qualities/values and set out for the company or person that shares those qualities/values. No compromise and no settling out of desperation till you find that company or person.

Know your leadership style

Interested in knowing your leadership style, here are a few links to help:

The Two Voices Every Leader Chases – Dr. Stephen R. Graves

The Two Voices Every Leader Chases – Dr. Stephen R. Graves
— Read on stephenrgraves.com/articles/read/the-two-voices-every-leader-chases/

Sharing another of Dr. Graves’ articles. Every leader must be able to discern these two voices; Voice of Inspiration and Voice of Instruction, amidst the daily and/or occasional confusion. Every leader must also know that God is not always in the midst of noise or everything that “seems good.”

Find your own circle (or team) of Inspiration and Instruction. In finding it, every leader must also know not to force or outstay it if it does not feel right.

Here’s to the best you (leader)! Enjoy the article and check him out as well at stephenrgraves.com.

More Is Caught Than Taught – Dr. Stephen R. Graves

More Is Caught Than Taught – Dr. Stephen R. Graves
— Read on stephenrgraves.com/articles/read/more-is-caught-than-taught/

Leadership. Leaders. Leaders and Leadership. We are all leaders in our own ways though many don’t ascribe to the title and some think that it’s humility to be titled a follower. We need both leaders and followers. As a matter of fact, every leader must be a follower or learn to follow at times; it’s a form of life balance.

The truth is that we are all one form of a leader in many ways.

I love leaders and leadership. I know that I haven’t blogged on it yet. Well, I’m sharing the first article/blog. I signed up for a webinar featuring Stephen R. Graves. It’s my first time hearing of him (I realize that there are a whole lot more great folks out there that I’m still yet to meet!) and decided to check him out before the day. This article/blog straight away caught my attention as it’s one of my favorite phrases.

The probability of leaders having like followers is higher than having dissimilar followers. Needless to say, leaders have to lead well.

Some things are taught, but many are caught. This phrase is particularly true with families. Without being specifically told, we find ourselves doing the same things we watch our parents do. We inherit their habits, styles, mannerisms, likes and dislikes, etc. My father loved to travel. When he does, we jest on how he packs like a woman because he overpacks. I realize now that I do the same; granted that I am the lady. And my daughters jest me on overpacking 😜. I justify my packing lol by responding that I do not want to buy things out there that I have at home and could have brought with me.

Guess what?! I now notice my daughters doing exactly the same! They caught my habit!

In the Bible, Elisha caught Elijah’s anointing and received a double-portion.

In essence, we ought to be mindful of all that we do because we never know who is watching!

What do you think? Leave your comments below. I hope you also learned something from Dr. Graves’ article.

Peace.